More concerns over plan for 185 homes

Land between Kensington Close and  Battlefields Lane, Holbeach.
Land between Kensington Close and Battlefields Lane, Holbeach.

RESIDENTS have opened the door to voice fresh concerns and objections to controversial plans to build nearly 200 new homes in Holbeach.

Outline planning permission was granted in January 2008 but this expires in December and developers must apply again to get it renewed for another period.

It has prompted many letters to South Holland District Council and an appeal from residents that new photographic evidence is considered amid their worries that 185 new homes off Battlefields Lane would add to flooding which has brought misery to residents in recent years.

Serena and Saffy Watts, of Battlefields Lane, said the fire service has been called to drain homes affected by flooding, gardens have been awash and they are worried by water running down from fields behind home.

They have sent the council photographs showing homes hit by excess water and say if land levels are artificially raised on the 15.5 acre housing site it would undoubtedly lead to increased flooding on Battlefields Lane South.

They also claim that a large housing development would add to the need for a new health centre, put pressure on education provision and roads and add to fears of the dangers of speeding traffic.

Mr and Mrs Watts say the traffic presents a danger not just to people but to animals too.

“Cars travel down our road at speed and often kill or injure our pets,” they say.

Qui Ha, who has lived in King’s Road for 12 years, is worried the new development will bring more traffic through the area, increasing the risk of accidents.

Ward councillor Martin Howard has also raised worries about more vehicles using Battlefields Lane, which he says has inadequate junctions.

“All in all a potentially dangerous situation could easily arise,” his letter states.

The January 2008 planning permission was granted to a company called Kingswood Investments, which has now sold the site to Stirling Mortimer, itself a huge marketing and investment operation.

Currently the Holbeach farmland comes within a package of seven sites, ranging from North Yorkshire to Dorset, that Stirling Mortimer is discussing selling to developers.

The planning consent for the Holbeach land limits any development to no more than 40 dwellings a year out of 185 properties, with some 30 per cent as affordable homes.