Mixed views on planned ban of new petrol and diesel cars

Electric cars could be the future on our roads by 2040.
Electric cars could be the future on our roads by 2040.
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Plans by the government to ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars in the UK by 2040 have had mixed reaction from car dealerships and commuters in South Holland.

And many feel that more must be done to improve infrastructure and educate people on the benefits of electric or hybrid cars.

Managing Director at Drayton Motors Darren Bradford thinks more needs to be done to educate people on the benefits on electric and hybrid cars.

Managing Director at Drayton Motors Darren Bradford thinks more needs to be done to educate people on the benefits on electric and hybrid cars.

The aim of the change is to tackle the rise of air pollution.

Darren Wood, sales manager at Vauxhall dealership Taylors in Spalding, believes that the UK’s stance on petrol and diesel cars may be a small drop in the ocean if countries such as America, China and India don’t follow suit.

He added: “A lot of the newer diesel cars are very clean and very efficient. Vauxhall has introduced a scrappage scheme where people can get £2,000 off a new car when they scrap their old diesel car. It is these older diesel cars that are being taken off the road.

“There are other fuel alternatives that can be looked at such as hydrogen fuel cells. There is too much misinformation about electric cars and it is about educating people.”

The automotive industry needs to educate the general public more on the key benefits

Darren Bradford, Managing Director at Drayton Motors in Swineshead

Darren Bradford, Managing Director at Drayton Motors in Swineshead, which specialises in new and used Kias, said: “All I can say is electric/hybrid vehicle sales for us over the past 12 months have not even been one per cent of our vehicle sales. I do feel they benefit the customer because of the low running costs but I feel the automotive industry needs to educate the general public more on the key benefits.”

Adam Brand, of WH Brand in Whaplode Drove, which specialises in MGs and Isuzus, said: “Some people will embrace it and I guess some won’t. A lot of it at the moment comes down to cost and the infrastructure is just not there. For people to use them the infrastructure is going to have to change massively over the next 23 years.

“I would agree that more needs to be done to educate people about the benefits of non-petrol and non-diesel cars. People think they can only go 20-30 miles and they don’t want to set out on a journey to be stranded but technology is changing.”

Our reporter Emer Scully asked commuters for their views on possibly saying goodbye to petrol and diesel engines.

Anne Tinkler (47), from Spalding, said: “I don’t know how it’s going to be rolled in and what people who already have petrol or diesel cars will have to do.

“Will they stop selling them? Will they say you can’t have that car anymore and you’ve got to buy this new one?

“I think the logistics of it all will be difficult. How will you recharge it? You go to a car park and there might be some slots and you get free charging.

“I wouldn’t have a choice but to buy one. It’s not something I’ve ever looked at but I suppose I’ll have to get one. I think a lot will be down to the cost of them. A lot of people can’t afford new cars and have to buy older ones.”

Robert Taylor, (45), from Spalding, said: “It might work. As long as my car is worn out by then it’s fine. I’d be happy to get it upgraded to an electric car if they got it all sorted out. I was a bit more concerned about what they were doing with diesels, and taxing them higher. I’ve just bought a diesel car so I thought it was a bit of a kick in the teeth. You might have to put new batteries in every now and then. If you’re going to travel with your car and other countries haven’t adapted it it could become a bit of a nightmare. Where are you going to stop to charge your car up overnight? Sometimes you don’t want to stop for 12 hours to charge up your car, you just want to fill up your car and go. Stick with the diesel I think.”

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