Life-saving equipment fitted outside store in Spalding

John Frank (EMAS) training  Jodine Evenden, back Glenda Kilbon, Elena Sperberga, Sarbjita Kandola and Carol Holland.

John Frank (EMAS) training Jodine Evenden, back Glenda Kilbon, Elena Sperberga, Sarbjita Kandola and Carol Holland.

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John Frank from EMAS is pictured outside Premier Stores, training Jodine Evenden. Behind them are Glenda Kilbon, Elena Sperberga, Sarbjita Kandola and Carol Holland. (SG111215-116TW)

The team at Premier Stores in Pennygate were shown how to use the defribillator installed outside their shop and get to grips with CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) by community resuscitation trainer for East Midlands Ambulance Service John Frank.

Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) occurs when the electrical rhythm that controls the heart is replaced by a chaotic disorganised rhythm called ventricular fibrillation.

A defibrillator can be used to give a high energy shock to the heart and can help to restore its rhythm.

Mr Frank said: “It is very simple to use a defibrillator and anyone can use one. In the case of an emergency if you call the ambulance service they can give you a code to access the defibrillator and you will be talked through how to use it.

“When giving CPR a person’s chance of survival can go up by seven per cent. In the case of using a defibrillator it can increase by 40-50 per cent.

“I had orginally approached the surgery on Pennygate about fitting the defibrillator but the requirement is that there needs to be 24 hour access. As it didn’t have 24 hour access I popped to the shop by chance and Mr Kandola, the owner, said he would be happy to help as they do have 24 hour access.

“I trained six of the staff members in CPD and how to use the defibrillator. Mr Kandola has also agreed to have one fitted at the Little London shop aswell.

“Defibrillators are quite a big thing in Lincolnshire and I have trained 2,000 people in how to use them and in CPD since August this year.”

Public access defibrillators (PADs) can be found in a number of public spaces.

In August this year devices were placed outside The South Holland Centre, Winfrey Avenue toilets and the Broadgate building in Westlode Street.

In an emergency look for a briefcase-sized box on the wall that contains the PAD. It is there for anyone to use on someone in cardiac arrest.

Once in position, the defibrillator detects the heart’s rhythm. It won’t deliver a shock unless one is needed.

When you call 999, the operator can tell you if there’s a public access defibrillator nearby and give you a code to open the device and the unit will then provide audible instructions to follow.