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Patient urged ‘Talk to us – we do care’

Jean Ruck at a Dignity Action Day stall at Pilgrim Hospital, Boston.

Jean Ruck at a Dignity Action Day stall at Pilgrim Hospital, Boston.

A 23-year-old Holbeach man who suffered an electric shock at work is being urged to contact a Lincolnshire NHS trust so it can investigate the lack of care he claims he received.

The story of Michael Young’s experience at Pilgrim Hospital in Boston made the front page of the Spalding Guardian last week.

United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust (ULHT) said it was extremely disappointed it was unable to respond to the patient’s claims before the newspaper went to press.

Mr Young, of Fleet Road, was admitted to Pilgrim Hospital in November 2011 when he received an electric shock after being asked to turn back overhead bulbs that had been switched off in the fairy lights aisle of the store where he worked.

His story was told ahead of the Dignity Action Day, which was held in hospitals nationwide to highlight their commitment to treating patients with respect.

He claimed it took two visits by ambulance and being almost paralysed with pain before he was given a MRI scan and said he felt that because he had walked into hospital no-one seemed to believe his injuries were serious.

Now awaiting treatment at another hospital, he said: “I realise a lot of patients who go there have more visible injuries, but everyone deserves to be treated with dignity.”

Communications manager Clare White said: “ULHT takes dignity in care extremely seriously and expects every patient to be treated with dignity and respect.

“The Trust launched a set of Dignity Pledges two years ago which every member of staff is expected to uphold. These pledges are widely publicised on every ward and department and any patient, visitor or carer is encouraged to challenge where they see the Dignity Pledges failing to be upheld.

“We recommend that the patient contacts the Trust directly to enable us to investigate his concerns.”

 

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