DCSIMG

Children’s safety more important than being politically correct

George Orwell's 1984 ANL-140109-111959001

George Orwell's 1984 ANL-140109-111959001

MP John Hayes writes for spaldingtoday

In his great dystopian novel 1984, George Orwell wrote of a society where the expression of supposedly unacceptable views, however well founded, is labelled as a ‘thoughtcrime’.

In modern Britain it isn’t the state that punishes people for alleged ‘thoughtcrimes’, but the metropolitan liberal establishment.

While some aspects of what is often described as ‘political correctness’ are merely the common courtesies of civilised society, more often than not political correctness resembles the kind of thought control Orwell characterised so memorably.

The consequence, as Orwell predicted, is that some people stop thinking at all.

If you are one of those consider my comparison between modern day political correctness and Orwell’s nightmarish vision an exaggeration, the appalling events in Rotherham should make you think again.

What is particularly shocking is that much of the sexual abuse that took place there could have been prevented if the authorities had acted objectively.

An independent report by Professor Alexis Jay into the abuse of more than 1,400 children in Rotherham – mainly by men of Pakistani origin – found that members and staff at Rotherham Council avoided discussion of the allegations because they decided that to do so would ‘give oxygen’ to racist views.

Professor Jay found that a report written back in 2002 was ‘effectively suppressed’ and the author subjected to ‘personal hostility’ by the local authorities simply because it found a link between perpetrators of abuse and ethnicity.

As Professor Jay writes ‘had this report been treated with the seriousness it merited... the children involved then and later would have been better protected and abuses brought to justice.’

The mix of political correctness and the credo of multiculturalism have a lot to answer for.

It is the duty of those with responsibility to protect us and our children. Any common factor that links the perpetrators of abuse or other serious crimes, be it race, religion or geography, should always be properly investigated, even if to do so contradicts the prejudices of the liberal elite.

Protection of our children, truth and justice matter much more than political correctness.

Those, from wherever they come, who can’t accept our standards, our values and our laws are not welcome.

We can only build a better society if we are honest with ourselves about problems we face.

As Orwell wrote: “The greatest enemy of clear language is insincerity.” As the events in Rotherham remind us, insincerity can have terrible consequences.

 

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