Heavy summer rainfall causes property misery

Steve Gosling sweeping from neighbour's home in Gleed Avenue, Donington. Photo (TIM WILSON): SG060712-TW www.spaldingtoday.co.uk/buyaphoto
Steve Gosling sweeping from neighbour's home in Gleed Avenue, Donington. Photo (TIM WILSON): SG060712-TW www.spaldingtoday.co.uk/buyaphoto

A Donington family affected by flash floods has accused South Holland District Council of doing nothing to help them.

Council tenants Emma Sharpin (27) and husband Jamie (33) came within inches of being flooded after torrential rain caused havoc on Friday.

The Gleed Avenue couple, who have a six-year-old daughter, Summer-Louise, were almost helpless as water swept onto the driveway, garden and into their shed.

Household items, including a fridge freezer and tumble dryer, had to be replaced after the flooding also damaged electrical equipment.

Mrs Sharpin said: “I took my daughter to school at 8.30am and by 10am the flooding was all the way up to our front door. If it had been an inch more, it would have come through the house.

“I rang the council at 9.30am and they sent an electrician down who said there was nothing he could do.

“Then I rang the council again and said that we needed someone to come down because one of the drains was flooded. But they said there was nothing they could do and we were even expected to get our own sandbags to put in the shed.”

The couple spent the weekend cleaning up and replacing about £50 worth of food which had to be thrown away after their fridge freezer stopped working.

Mrs Sharpin said: “All the cleaning up is done, including my husband’s tools which we had to wipe down to stop them rusting. But we didn’t have any help, so we’re quite glad that the water didn’t come into the house.”

A council spokesman said: “We don’t provide sandbags to protect sheds, gardens and garages, but we do provide them, where it is possible, to protect domestic properties that are at real risk of flooding and where there is a realistic prospect that sandbags would provide such protection.”

Holbeach had the highest rainfall in the UK on Friday with almost 45mm in 24 hours according to the Met Office.

In February, temperatures in Holbeach dipped below -15C, making it officially the coldest town in the UK.

The rain also caused problems at Long Sutton Butterfly and Wildlife Park where school visits were disrupted.

Owner Michael Cross said: “We had floods water coming into the kitchen, birds of prey and tropical garden areas.

“I was very concerned, but a local company came out to clear the drains by the kitchen and we allowed the clearer weather to dry out the fields.”