South Holland brother and sister could have saved 600 lives between them

Brother and sister Arthur Baldwin and Jane Darley are lifesaving heroes.
Brother and sister Arthur Baldwin and Jane Darley are lifesaving heroes.

A South Holland brother and sister who have each donated 100 pints of blood could have saved a staggering 600 lives between them.

It’s rare for donors to reach the 100-pint milestone but Arthur Baldwin (64), from Donington, and his sister Jane Darley (66), from Pinchbeck, have achieved the feat together.

South Holland's fab four are Arthur Baldwin, Robert Fletcher, Jane Darley and Ian Hoult.

South Holland's fab four are Arthur Baldwin, Robert Fletcher, Jane Darley and Ian Hoult.

The siblings, originally from Donington Northorpe, could have been part of an even bigger family story as their brother John (62) was also a regular blood donor until about 20 years ago when he had a blood transfusion after fracturing his pelvis in a jet ski accident.

Arthur said: “He had given blood all those years and got the benefit of receiving some.”

But, once a donor receives blood, they are ruled out of making any more donations.

NHS Blood and Transplant says every single blood donation can either help or save the lives of up to three people.

There were three of us in the family at one stage giving blood and I would encourage newcomers to donate

Arthur Baldwin

Arthur and Jane joined Spalding men Robert Fletcher and Ian Hoult in a ceremony at Branston Hall, Lincoln, where they were each presented with medals and certificates for reaching their 100th donation milestones.

Only one-in-100 donors makes the ton.

There were also framed photographs and lapel badges to mark the milestone.

Jane (66) said: “There are not many people get to 100 and I don’t think there are many siblings get to 100 – and it’s especially unusual for them to be honoured at the same ceremony.

“I started when I was 17, that would be in 1967, because it’s something that doesn’t cost you anything and it’s helping a lot of people.”

The former teaching assistant at Gleed Boys’ School, Spalding, has already given a further five pints since she hit the ton and intends to continue as long as she can.

It’s unusual for donors to find out what happens after they have given blood.

Jane said: “This is the first year I have had a text to say where my blood has gone and it went to a hospital in Hertfordshire.”

Jane led the way in her family by donating blood, followed by brothers Arthur and John.

Arthur (64) spotted an advert for blood donors when he was at agricultural college and four or five pals gave it a go as a bit of a dare.

“I wasn’t fazed by it in any way and I have been proud to give blood ever since,” said Arthur, who works in agricultural sales. “There were three of us in the family at one stage giving blood and I would encourage newcomers to donate.”

• To find out about becoming a blood donor visit www.blood.co.uk