Gedney Drove End: school’s pat on the back

Headteacher Karyn Wiles celebrates a good Ofsted inspection in science with pupils William Gillam, Lucy McKenna, Sarah Mansfield, Zoe Franklin, Jamie Coe and Joe McIanally.
Headteacher Karyn Wiles celebrates a good Ofsted inspection in science with pupils William Gillam, Lucy McKenna, Sarah Mansfield, Zoe Franklin, Jamie Coe and Joe McIanally.

A VILLAGE school came under the spotlight during a special Ofsted inspection.

Inspector Brian Padgett spent a day at Gedney Drove End Primary School back in November looking at the way the school teaches science.

The resulting report rated the school good is every aspect of the subject.

Headteacher Karyn Wiles said: “We are really pleased with the Ofsted grading.

“The inspector was really in awe of what a small school like ours is able to offer the pupils.

“Ofsted like to do subject specific surveys and choose a random sample of schools nationwide.

“Of those they choose one large school and one small school to look at and this time we were picked as the small school.

“We are delighted that they have recognised the quality of teaching we deliver.”

In a letter to the school Mr Padgett said the evidence used to inform the judgement included interviews with staff and pupils, scrutiny of relevant documentation, analysis of pupil’s work and observation of three lessons.

The overall effectiveness of science was rated good, along with achievement, the quality of teaching, the quality of the curriculum and the effectiveness of leadership and management in science.

Mr Padgett’s letter said: “Teaching of an outstanding quality was observed. This was achieved when excellent generic teaching skills were combined with high levels of understanding in science, including the precise use of the language of, in this case, electrical circuits.

“All pupils made at least good progress in this lesson.”

The only area highlighted for improvement was developing teachers’ marking to help pupils identify the next stages in their learning.

Miss Wiles added: “We have a good marking practice with literacy and numeracy and the inspector wanted to see that applied to science as well, which we are already working on.”