FRACKING: MP right to say Greenpeace is being alarmist

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John Hayes is right to dismiss Greenpeace as “alarmist”. Until extensive fracking takes place no one can say what the effects on the environment, if any, will be.

Legislation has been put in place to safeguard the environment.

UK regulations have been designed to ensure the exploitation of shale gas in the UK does not give rise to such issues.

The government has decided on behalf of the public that fracking will be used to extract gas from sedimentay shale rock formations in the UK.

This will reduce dependence upon imports and should provide cheaper energy.

There are potential risks from fracking. Carbon dioxide and methane emissions; the volumes of water and the chemicals used in fracking and their subsequent disposal; the possible risk of contaminating groundwater; competing land-use requirements in densely populated areas; the possibility of increased seismic activity, according to the British Geological Survey.

The Department for Energy and Climate Change states that the potential impacts of production operations are tentative, or qualified as production has not yet started in the UK

The legislation is designed to minimise the risk of the aforementioned occurring, but until the process starts, no one knows. If everything goes according to those who support this new system, then no damage to the environment will occur and we will reap the benefits of gas as, we did with North Sea oil.

In other countries where shale gas exploitation is well established, various problems have arisen, but UK regulations have been designed to ensure the exploitation of shale gas in the UK does not give rise to such issues.

As more complex issues come to the fore the need for our MPs to understand issues should be an increased priority, as the proponents of such issues have developed much improved methods of justifying these types of technology.

Mike Harrison

via email