Farmers told by Gosberton mum to ‘clean up your act’

Gemma Gilliatt and children Tyler, Lillie-Mae and Ellie Scott, with  Michelle Wiseman, James and Scarlet Yarnell in Gosberton Bank where complaints have been made about drivers leaving mud on the roads.  Photo by Tim Wilson.
Gemma Gilliatt and children Tyler, Lillie-Mae and Ellie Scott, with Michelle Wiseman, James and Scarlet Yarnell in Gosberton Bank where complaints have been made about drivers leaving mud on the roads. Photo by Tim Wilson.
  • Parent’s concern as mud left by HGVs turns village road into an ‘ice rink’
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A mother-of-four from Gosberton has finally run out oof patience with farmers she claims are leaving mud on the road with no consideration for others.

Gemma Gilliatt (33) has complained to the police and Lincolnshire highways officers over the state of Gosberton Bank which she accused farming businesses of “turning into an ice rink”.

There’s literally four or five inches of mud left on the road and when it rains, Gosberton Bank turns into an ice rink.

Gemma Gilliatt of Gosberton

Despite a number of warnings by police, Gemma claimed the problem was still ongoing and slammed agricultural firms in the area for not even putting out “Caution Mud on Road” signs.

Gemma said: “I’ve lived here for about three years and the problem has been going on for that long.

“There’s literally four or five inches of mud left on the road and when it rains, it turns the road into an ice rink.

“It’s so skiddy and slippery and every year, the police and PCSO keep going to these firms.

“But they never clean up the road or put any warning signs out, even though the police told me that they’ve given out verbal warnings and said they’ll take things further if there were any more problems.”

Under the Highways Act 1980, farmers and agricultural drivers who leave mud on the road can be prosecuted if someone is injured or put in danger.

Mud left on the road can also be seen as dangerous driving under the Road Traffic Act 1988, with the term “dangerous” applying to anything attached to a vehicle such as mud, as well as a breach of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 under which farmers are regarded as employers.

Gemma said: “I know nine people who have complained to police about the state of the road and one morning, my daughter was left covered in mud because cars drove past her without slowing down.

“I want police to act further on this so that farmers clean up the road”

Coun Robert Clark, South Holland District Council member for Gosberton, said: “Gosberton Bank is a very twisty, narrow road with sharp drops on either side and one to treat with caution at all times.

“If those affected could take photographs of the offenders, when the offences are taking place, it would help the authorities in taking action “Continuous pressure and evidence would be the best course of action.”

John Siddle of Lincolnshire Road Safety Partnership said: “If the road is considered to be an immediate risk, police can close it and bring resources in to make it safe, with the person or company responsible for depositing the mud or debris liable for the costs of the clean-up.

“Signs would not absolve them of their responsibilities towards other road users.”

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