Farming and wildlife

Annette and Colin Faulkner with fellow Lincolnshire Bat Group member Ali Brown (left) at the Lincolnshire Show. Photo (TIM WILSON): SG190614-102TW
Annette and Colin Faulkner with fellow Lincolnshire Bat Group member Ali Brown (left) at the Lincolnshire Show. Photo (TIM WILSON): SG190614-102TW

Much of the UK’s wildlife depends on farmland, according to the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds.

The organisation is working with farmers to find and share practical wildlife-friendly farming techniques.

According to the RSPB, three-quarters of the land in the UK is farmed – providing vital food for the nation.

However, agriculture is equally important for wildlife, providing breeding and feeding habitats for birds and other animals and plants.

The RSPB says: “Agricultural can be good or bad for the environment, depending on the land management. For example, the soil on a farm can be managed so that it stores, filters and recycles carbon, rainwater and nutrients or so that it erodes, loses fertility or compacts, losing its value.

“Hedges can give food and shelter for birds and other wildlife, or be barren and sparse. The fields themselves can be managed to provide food and habitat for farmland wildlife at the same time as producing crops or livestock.”

Lincolnshire Bat Group members Colin and Annette Faulkner from Spalding were at the recent Lincolnshire Show trying to spread the word about wildlife conservation – and bats in particular. They were showing two rescue bats, a pipistrelle and noctule, to interested visitors.