Deeping St Nicholas farmer talks weather

Nicholas Watts.
Nicholas Watts.
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There was a beautiful red sky last Tuesday morning as I looked over the Welland towards Crowland Abbey and of course a red sky in the morning is a shepherd’s warning of bad weather coming, writes Nicholas Watts.

There was a beautiful red sky last Tuesday morning as I looked over the Welland towards Crowland Abbey and of course a red sky in the morning is a shepherd’s warning of bad weather coming. There is also a saying ‘Rain in the east 24 hours at least’ and that is exactly what happened last Wednesday.

It is not that the rain had come from the east. It was because the depression had tracked further south than usual and we were near the centre of it, which is where there is the most rain. Over the past four months these depressions have been following one another up the west coast of Scotland, dropping record amounts of rain, while we have just been receiving the tail end of these depressions resulting in us having average amounts of rain. In fact it was drying up quite nicely until last Wednesday when we had 38mm of rain, which was the largest amount of rain we have had in one go since April 2012.

April 2012 was the wettest April in living memory and it continued wet with very little sunshine, resulting in the worst wheat crop in living memory. It had followed one of the driest years I have recorded. 2015 was also a very dry year and it is quite common to have a wet year after a dry year. We can’t do anything about it; we will just have to have what comes, but maybe some of you would like a wet summer? I would rather have a dry summer as it is far more pleasant farming without having mud on my boots and also usually more financially rewarding than a wet year.