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Tiny Shepeau Stow is one of the nation’s top 1,000 schools

Headteacher Alison Buddle, when the school celebrated its Ofsted result, with pupils Lucy Chamberlain, Alfie Ling, Alfie Saunders, Megan Preston, Emily Hemsworth and Kyle Warner.

Headteacher Alison Buddle, when the school celebrated its Ofsted result, with pupils Lucy Chamberlain, Alfie Ling, Alfie Saunders, Megan Preston, Emily Hemsworth and Kyle Warner.

A tiny South Holland primary school is among the nation’s elite top 1,000 following publication of SATS results.

Shepeau Stow Primary is around 65th on the list nationally – depending on how results are calculated – and fourth in Lincolnshire.

Nine Shepeau Stow pupils sat exams with a 100 per cent pass rate at level four – the standard pupils are expected to achieve before going on to secondary schools – and there was a 56 per cent pass rate at the higher level 5 standard.

Shepeau Stow headteacher Alison Buddle said: “We are extremely pleased.

“It’s down to the hard work of the pupils and the staff.

“We have very supportive parents and a hard working, supportive governing body.

“We have some extremely good teaching going on and the children are really dedicated.”

Shepeau Stow Primary has only 67 pupils overall, three classes and 12 members of staff.

The school is rated “good” by Ofsted and Mrs Buddle said it has seen an “improving trend” over the last three years.

Mrs Buddle said the school knew it had done “extremely well”, but didn’t know it had made the nation’s top 1,000 until the chairman of governors, David Goose, phoned through with the news.

She said: “The governing body are obviously pleased with the progress we have made.”

The school isn’t planning a celebration to mark its big achievement.

SATS, also known as Key Stage 2 National Curriculum Assessment results, measure progress in reading, writing and maths.

Children from Lincolnshire schools outperformed national and regional averages in all three subjects.

In reading, Lincolnshire children notched up a 90 per cent pass rate, two per cent above the national average and three per cent above the East Midlands Average.

County children had a 93 per cent pass rate in writing, one per cent better than the national average and two per cent better than the East Midlands.

The Lincolnshire maths pass rate was 89 per cent, again one per cent better than the national average and two per cent better than the East Midlands.

A total of 19 Lincolnshire schools had 100 per cent of their pupils hitting level 4 and better.

The county executive councillor for children’s services, Patricia Bradwell, said: “The hard work and determination of schools – pupils, staff, governors and parents – is making a difference and has once again been rewarded with some impressive results.

“Lincolnshire children continue to achieve better results than their contemporaries across the country.

“We are extremely proud of these achievements as we continue to outperform national averages.”

 

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