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Swapping the playing fields of Eton for Bourne

The Tatler lists Bourne Grammar as one of the nations top 20 state secondary schools  pupils are pictured here at their December prize giving when the guest of honour was former Tory MP, Michael Portillo.

The Tatler lists Bourne Grammar as one of the nations top 20 state secondary schools  pupils are pictured here at their December prize giving when the guest of honour was former Tory MP, Michael Portillo.

High society magazine The Tatler is urging its readers to send their children to Bourne Grammar School rather than exclusive private schools like Eton.

Bourne Grammar – described by the magazine as “educational nirvana” – is the only Lincolnshire school listed among its top 20 state secondary schools.

It says the creme de la creme of state schools give children a better preparation for the real world, “the one where not everything is handed to them on a sterling silver platter”, and when ex-pupils do finally get into the Cabinet “everyone will love you because you didn’t go to Eton”.

Bourne Grammar School headteacher John Maddox said: “The Tatler article, which was based on parental feedback, paints a vivid picture of our school. Anyone associated with the school will know that it rings true.

“It is wonderful to be recognised so publicly as we move into another exciting year of expansion and future improvement.

“Our purpose statement says we are about the best atmosphere, the best support, the best results – that will always be the case as the school expands.”

The Tatler article is quoted in The Times, The Telegraph, The Independent and Daily Mail, all of which mention Bourne Grammar.

The magazine says putting “two children through the private system costs around £600,000 – that’s £1.2million before tax”.

The Tatler’s review was compiled from the views of parents, pupils, teachers and heads, listing attributes such as new buildings, strong discipline, sporting rigour and academic ambition.

It says: “Bourne is very popular: for September 2014 entry, more than 460 pupils sat the 11-plus tests for 224 places.”

The article quotes a mother who says the school caters for children of air vice-marshals to farmers and, rich or poor, all live in harmony “with no snobbery and very little bullying”.

 

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