Schools travel in time to bring terrific Tudors to life

BREAD BAKERS: Riley Carnell, Jenson Pegler, Jarrod Price, George Skipper, Leah Person, Veer Odedra, Maya Dewhurst, Jacob Clery making Manchet bread.
BREAD BAKERS: Riley Carnell, Jenson Pegler, Jarrod Price, George Skipper, Leah Person, Veer Odedra, Maya Dewhurst, Jacob Clery making Manchet bread.

It was a day of Tudor tastes and traditional tailoring for pupils from the federated schools of Gedney Church End Primary and Lutton St Nicholas Primary.

Both staff and pupils dressed up to bring the day to life.

STEW CHEFS: Samuel Skate, Jordan Playford, Darcy Wigmore, Grace Twigge, Clayton Taylor, Ryan Still, Alec Ackah, William Stevenson making Pottage Veg Stew.

STEW CHEFS: Samuel Skate, Jordan Playford, Darcy Wigmore, Grace Twigge, Clayton Taylor, Ryan Still, Alec Ackah, William Stevenson making Pottage Veg Stew.

Years four and five came together at Gedney while years five and six and went back to the Tudors at Lutton.

They wore traditional Tudor clothing, with some of the boys in hats and waist jackets while the girls modelled bonnets and dresses .

Throughout the day everyone took part in different Tudor past times.

For a taste of the time some pupils played chef and made their own Tudor manchet bread from scratch.

To go with the bread they chopped vegetables for a pottage – a soup-like medieval British stew.

Other groups of pupils worked on making pomanders, a perfumed ball worn in Tudor times.

Finally there was fun with clay to produce counters for a board game of Nine Men’s Morris, also known as Merelles.

After all the hard work the day concluded with a celebratory banquet.

Everyone gathered together to share the activities they had taken part in and sat down to try the pottage and manchet bread.

In full costume and full of medieval smells and flavours, the school brought to life what living in Tudor Britain was like.

Carol Grief, senior teacher at Gedney Church End Primary School, said: “It was thoroughly enjoyable day for everyone.”