New police cells and office could be in Sutterton

A TWO-storey police office and 30-cell custody suite could be built at Sutterton – or on another site between Spalding and Boston – by the world’s largest security company, G4S.

Lincolnshire Police Authority struck a deal with the company that will see its employees take over some jobs handled by police officers.

The outsourcing contract is worth £200million over ten years and it emerged this week that a new ‘police station’ is part of the deal and its construction and staffing will be a nationwide-first for an outside contractor.

Lincolnshire Police Authority refuses to reveal potential sites, but someone closely connected with police matters – who asked not to be named – this week told the Spalding Guardian that the police office and cells are likely to be built at Sutterton or on a site between Spalding and Boston.

The source told us: “It’s down to G4S. They will do what they think commercially is better for them. It’s likely to serve more than one police station.”

Police authority chairman Coun Barry Young said: “Because of commercial sensitivity, we cannot comment until the formal contract with G4S – of which this is only one aspect – has been signed.

“Once a potential site has been identified, a planning application will be made to the relevant district authority. It will be for local planning officers to assess the application to ensure that it complies with national, county and local planning requirements and policies.

“They will also take into account representations made by technical consultees, such as the highways authority and the environment agency, and by the general public.”

Coun Young said Lincolnshire has four “designated” custody suites providing a total of 61 cells with “standby” custody suites offering a further 26.

No firm decisions have been made on whether some existing cells will close once the new complex opens.

The new cells will be built on a “hub and spokes” model so more cells can be added when needed.

Former Lincolnshire Police Authority member Coun Phil Dilks criticised the authority for not naming potential sites when the £200million is coming from the public’s pockets.

He said: “Surely the public who are paying for it have a right to know?”