Lincolnshire Police told to do better on crime

Police and specialist officers in Spalding with mascot Bobby Bear, youngsters and parents at a community engagement event in Sheep Market, Spalding.  Photo by Tim Wilson.
Police and specialist officers in Spalding with mascot Bobby Bear, youngsters and parents at a community engagement event in Sheep Market, Spalding. Photo by Tim Wilson.

Lincolnshire Police must do better in the way its officers investigate crime, according to the findings of a new report.

Despite a 20 per cent reduction in recorded crime (except fraud) between June 2010 an June 2014, compared to a 16 per cent drop across all forces in England and Wales, policing of crime in Lincolnshire has been branded as “variable”.

South Holland community policing inspector Jim Tyner with stars of the TV series 'Police Interceptors, PCs Sarah Draper and Suzie Raynard.  Photo by Tim Wilson.

South Holland community policing inspector Jim Tyner with stars of the TV series 'Police Interceptors, PCs Sarah Draper and Suzie Raynard. Photo by Tim Wilson.

The report from Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) did find that Lincolnshire Police was good at crime reduction and prevention, tackling anti-social behaviour and managing its £112.5 million budget in 2014/15.

Speaking to the Free Press, Lincolnshire Police and Crime Commissioner Alan Hardwick said: “The HMIC report contains no surprises and I know there are areas where we can improve.

“I do welcome the report as it actually paints a very good picture of what is happening here in Lincolnshire.

“But it does also point out areas where we need to do better and steps are being taken to make sure resources are prioritised so that victims of crime are at the centre of what we do.”

An extract from the HMIC report said: “The quality of investigation in Lincolnshire is variable, with different approaches taken to planning and supervision.

“HMIC found that there are inconsistencies in the quality of investigations, reducing the chances of successful prosecution in some cases.

“Delays in the management of investigations are sometimes compromising the force’s ability to investigate crimes effectively and provide a service to victims.

“Lincolnshire Police makes extensive and appropriate use of restorative justice as a way of resolving selected investigations, in consultation with victims and with good, independent oversight.”