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Tax office to make way for new homes?

BIG PLANS: The tax office (left) is due to be demolished to make way for new homes while there are plans to convert Holland House into apartments. SG040214-229TW

BIG PLANS: The tax office (left) is due to be demolished to make way for new homes while there are plans to convert Holland House into apartments. SG040214-229TW

The site of Spalding’s derelict tax office and the historic Holland House are set to be given a new lease of life with apartments and houses.

Long Sutton company D & R Property Services is seeking planning consent to convert Holland House into five “high quality apartments” and put a three-storey Georgian style building – containing six apartments – alongside it, facing the river.

The plans include demolition of the 1960s tax office and replacing it with a terrace of two and three-storey Victorian style houses – 11 in all – with parking behind.

Robert Spenceley, from the development company, said: “We are looking to redevelop an unused derelict site and provide high quality accommodation within walking distance of the town centre, as a result improving the appearance of the river frontage and surrounding area.

“We have worked closely with Grover Lewis Associates (built heritage experts) to ensure the style is in keeping with the surrounding area.”

Plans have already been submitted to South Holland District Council and a verdict is expected by March 18.

According to the planning application, the site currently has 40 parking spaces but this will go down by 18 to 22.

One Holland Road resident, Nick Richer, is asking the district council to look at the number of parking spaces per home so residents “can safely drive in and out of their properties”.

He says: “We have a lot of problems with parking down Holland Road. The staff from the medical centre and nursery, plus others walking into town for work or shopping, all see the road as a free car park.”

The three-storey Holland House, a grade II listed building, dates from around 1768 and an important owner and occupier was Theophilus Fairfax Johnson (1790-1853), a member of the Johnson family, whose principal home was Ayscoughfee Hall.

 

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