Community library for Holbeach to open soon

Coun Nick Worth is delighted by the number of volunteers who have come forward to run Holbeach Library. SG110913-223NG
Coun Nick Worth is delighted by the number of volunteers who have come forward to run Holbeach Library. SG110913-223NG
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Holbeach is expected to see its new-style, volunteer-run library open during the last week of October.

More than 30 volunteers have come forward and county councillor Nick Worth, Lincolnshire’s executive member for libraries, is delighted there’s been such an enthusiastic response.

Coun Worth said: “Last time I looked, I had about 36 volunteers, which is really good because I think the target was 30.”

Holbeach volunteers have already completed two training sessions, on health and safety and equality and diversity, and the next will give them more direct training on running the library and its simple computer system, Spydus Light, which enables people to order books but doesn’t give volunteers access to confidential data.

Holbeach was one of 30 tier-3, council staffed libraries that closed at the end of September as the council aimed to achieve savings of around £2million by having them run as volunteer “community hubs”.

Coun Worth said Holbeach library users will get all of the same services as before.

He said opening hours at Holbeach have yet to be decided, but it’s likely at first they will be on similar lines to before and perhaps be extended at a later date.

Eleven of the community hub libraries reopened in September, Holbeach is one of five due to open this month and a further seven are set to open in November.

Coun Worth said the council is supporting libraries with revenue of £5,167 each year with a one-off £15,000 grant for any capital works.

There will also be ongoing training.

• Holbeach Library’s Church Street premises opened to the public in 1973. Users have been accessing services from Long Sutton during its temporary closure.

Previously ...

Library volunteers plea ‘putting an end to council cuts politics’