Charlotte snaps up a chance to shine

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CHARLOTTE Eades-Willis isn’t the sort of girl anyone would expect to excel in life.

The 19-year-old from Spalding lives with autism and another condition on the autistic spectrum, Asperger’s Syndrome, disabilities that make it more difficult for her to communicate with others.

To make life tougher still she copes with dyslexia, impairing her ability to read or spell.

But Charlotte is carving out her own niche in life behind the lens and has just put some of her photographs on display at one of the biggest not for profit arts exhibition centres in the East of England.

Charlotte’s work is described as “outstanding” by the boss of the Realitas Community Arts Centre at Peakirk, near Peterborough.

And Charlotte’s drive to succeed has also put her on course to gain a degree.

Charlotte said: “My interest for photography started at a very young age when I got a children’s two-handed Kodak camera. My interest has now become a passion and I am currently studying for a lens-based media degree.

“Being able to exhibit my work at the Realitas Community Arts Centre is a real plus and it shows what people can do when they put their mind to things. I hope local people will go and see my work there.”

Ninety artists from Lincolnshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire exhibit at Realitas.

Realitas managing director Neil McGregor-Paterson said: “We are delighted to be partnering with Charlotte.

“Her work is outstanding and Charlotte is a great role model for anyone living with a long-term health condition.”

Charlotte was not diagnosed with her health problems until she was 13 years of age.

Autism is a life-long developmental disorder that affects someone’s natural ability to communicate with and relate to other people.

The condition also affects a person’s skill in making sense of the world around them.

Asperger’s Syndrome similarly makes it hard for a sufferer to “read” the signals which most of us take for granted and can lead to the sufferer experiencing high levels of confusion and anxiety.