Charity shops want your stuff

It's hats off to the supporters of the Butterfly Hospice Trust Charity Shop in Spalding. Customers are pictured with volunteers (back, from left) Zaheer Younas, Maureen Harker, Imran Afgan, Sandra Dawson, (front) Pat Badcock, Kirsty Lynch and shop manager Sue Alexander.
It's hats off to the supporters of the Butterfly Hospice Trust Charity Shop in Spalding. Customers are pictured with volunteers (back, from left) Zaheer Younas, Maureen Harker, Imran Afgan, Sandra Dawson, (front) Pat Badcock, Kirsty Lynch and shop manager Sue Alexander.

BOOMING sales at charity shops in the Spalding area could get an extra boost following a national appeal for stock.

Local volunteers are backing Choose Charity Shops week in a bid to get more people to donate directly to them and meet rising demand.

A spokesman for the Charity Retail Association said: “Shops thrive on donations, but their number one concern at the moment is not having enough second-hand items to sell.”

Sue Alexander, manager of Spalding’s Butterfly Hospice Trust shop in Sheepmarket, said: “More people are coming to us from all walks of life, but you are only as good as the things you sell.”

Next door, Oxfam has been helped by Marks and Spencer’s “shwopping” campaign.

Volunteer Carol Simmonds said: “If people can’t get to stores, they can bring used and unwanted M&S clothes directly to us and we will give them a £5 voucher.”

Liz Robson, assistant manager of Holbeach’s Sue Ryder Care shop in High Street, said donations had dropped this year.

She said: “People are holding on to things to sell at car boot sales and on eBay. They are still being very generous, though.”

The Salvation Army shop in West Street, Bourne, is totally reliant on direct donations. Manager Beth Grief said: “We are lucky to get designer brands. They fly out.”

Even brides are looking to save money.

Manager of the Break shop in High Street, Holbeach, said: “That shows how the economy is. Just keep giving!”