Battle won over Spalding bridge litter – but war goes on

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A SPALDING grot spot is finally looking “spick and span” after a prolonged campaign to get it cleaned up.

South Holland district councillor Roger Gambba-Jones has been waging an ongoing battle to persuade Network Rail to remove piles of rubbish which had been dumped around Steppingstone Bridge.

After numerous promises to carry out the work, Network Rail was on its last chance as Coun Gambba-Jones prepared to take the case to court to pursue a litter abatement notice.

But workmen finally turned up on Thursday and Coun Gambba-Jones is pleased with the result.

But he is still determined to pursue Network Rail to return to remove graffiti blighting the bridge.

He said: “It’s looking much more spick and span but as I understood it one of the previous delays had been because they were waiting for the paint so they could cover the graffiti.

“Perhaps it was the rain on Thursday that prevented them doing it, but I will continue to chase them to make sure it gets done.

“Now I just hope that the public notice that the area has been cleaned up and don’t allow it to get into such a bad state again.

“I don’t hold out much hope, and if it does get bad again I’ll be back on to Netwrok Rail to get them out to clear it up again.”

In April Coun Gambba-Jones received the backing of fellow district councillors to apply pressure to Network Rail to spruce up the bridge area, which crosses the railway line and links Park Road with King’s Road.

He had hoped the work could be carried out before the town’s flower parade at the beginning of May as he believed the grot spot gave a bad impression of Spalding to the thousands of visitors who make the journey for the huge event.

Outlining his battle to fellow councillors Coun Gambba-Jones likened the bridge to “something you would expect to see in the less pleasant areas of large inner cities that have been neglected for decades”

As well as the rubbish and graffiti, problems highlighted with the bridge also include its enclosed sides and a lack of lighting, which have lead to safety concerns, and an unattractive fence.